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Mark Ford
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August 31, 2018 01:52 AM PDT
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Guest interviewer Suzannah V. Evans sits down with Mark Ford in an interview recorded at the StAnza Poetry Festival. Ford discusses the influence of Ashbery and O'Hara, Walt Whitman's 'children', and how he puts a set together for a reading.

Sarah Stewart and Russell Jones
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July 25, 2018 04:58 AM PDT
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Our latest episode has not one but two poets: Sarah Stewart and Russell Jones, emerging voices on the Scottish poetry scene. Both are writers and editors based in Edinburgh who have new pamphlets published by Tapsalteerie: Glisk by Stewart, Dark Matters by Jones.

Jones has published several pamphlets and a full-length collection in 2015 on Freight Books, The Green Dress Whose Girl is Sleeping. He was also co-editor of the anthology Umbrellas of Edinburgh (Freight).

Glisk is Stewart's first pamphlet. She is also known as Sarah Forbes, author of the Elspeth Hart series of books for children. Together, the poets discuss sexism, apocalypses and Daleks.

Sean O'Brien
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June 28, 2018 06:09 AM PDT
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As the age of Brexit continues to bear down on Britain, Sean O'Brien returns with a collection called Europa (Picador). One of only two poets to win the Forward and T.S. Eliot Prizes for the same collection (The Drowned Book in 2007), O'Brien talks to the SPL about fascism, leaving Europe (and whether it's actually even possible) and liking bands long after they've passed they sell-by date.

Eileen Myles
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May 15, 2018 04:44 AM PDT
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Poet, novelist, and essayist Eileen Myles is a trailblazer whose decades of literary and artistic work 'set a bar for openness, frankness, and variability few lives could ever match' (New York Review of Books). In March, they performed at the Scottish Poetry Library, reading from a new memoir Afterglow (A Dog Memoir). While here, we sat down with Eileen to talk about how to be an artist during the Trump era, anthropomorphism and the linguistic legacy of growing up working class. As well as pondering whether George W Bush was a space snake alien thing.

Rory Waterman
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March 23, 2018 07:25 AM PDT
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Rory Waterman is the author of Tonight the Summer's Over and Sarajevo Roses, both published by Carcanet. Rory was born in Belfast in 1981 before moving at an early age to Lincolnshire. Today, he's senior lecturer in English at Nottingham Trent University and co-edits the poetry pamphlet series New Walk Editions. In our latest podcast, Rory Waterman discusses writing poems about Trump and Brexit, growing up the child of divorce, and running a poetry magazine.

Elaine Feinstein
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February 27, 2018 05:35 AM PST
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Elaine Feinstein is a poet, translator, novelist, playwright and biographer. Her last collection, The Clinic, Memory (Carcanet) combines new poems with a 'best of', bringing together over half a century’s worth of work. During the podcast, Feinstein discusses anti-semitism, Donald Trump, Don Quixote and translating poetry.

Image by V. Carew Hunt

Alan Spence
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February 02, 2018 06:56 AM PST
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Our first podcast of 2018 features an interview with new Edinburgh Makar Alan Spence. Novelist, short-story writer, dramatist and, of course, poet, Spence is one of the leading lights of the Scottish literary scene. With his work informed by his Buddhism, Spence imbues his poetry with both a cosmic perspective and a Scottish sensibility to comic and enlightening effect. During the course of the interview, Spence discusses Zen and the art of poetry, working with visual artists, and the rivalry between Glasgow and Edinburgh.

Peter Mackay
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December 20, 2017 06:08 AM PST
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Pàdraig MacAoidh / Peter Mackay is a native Gaelic speaker from the Isle of Lewis. He is an academic, writer and broadcaster whose work is influenced by the diverse linguistic heritage of his birthplace. His debut collection, Gu Leòr / Galore, was published by Acair. In our latest podcast, Mackay discusses repressed Scots, journalism versus poetry, and growing up bilingual.

Hera Lindsay Bird
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November 28, 2017 03:54 AM PST
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Hera Lindsay Bird is a poet from New Zealand. Her first poetry collection, also called Hera Lindsay Bird, was published in July 2016 by Victoria University Press and quickly sold out its first print run. A UK edition was published in November 2017. In August, when Bird was in Edinburgh to take part in the Edinburgh International Book Festival, she found time to come down to the Scottish Poetry Library. While in the Library, she argued in favour of hating wisely, what it's like when a poem goes viral, and why sentiment is nothing to be scared of.

Henry Marsh
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November 03, 2017 04:26 AM PDT
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Henry Marsh is a Scottish poet who divides his time writing about the natural world and Scotland's troubled history. In the past, he's written about Mary Queen of Scots, John Knox and the Covenanters. In his latest collection, Under Winter Skies (Birlinn), Marsh focuses on James Graham, the first Marquess of Montrose, a brilliant soldier and poet who changed sides during the War of the Three Kingdoms. Marsh explains why he wanted to write an entire collection about this tragic figure in the SPL's latest podcast.

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